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CALS 2021 Summer Term courses that have no prerequisites and fulfill breadth requirements

Summer Term courses are a great way for UW undergraduates to get ahead—or stay on track—in their studies. They are also open to students enrolled at other universities, high school students and the general public. Below are some 2021 Summer Term courses from the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences that have no prerequisites and are open to all interested learners. These courses also fulfill breadth requirements such as Biological Science, Physical Science, Social Science and Humanities.

For more information about Summer Term, tuition and a full list of available courses, visit https://summer.wisc.edu/. See more information about CALS courses on the CALS 2021 Summer Term page.

AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS/AGRONOMY/INTER-AG/NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES 350: World Hunger and Malnutrition
Hunger and poverty in developing countries and the United States. Topics include: nutrition and health, population, food production and availability, and income distribution and employment.
July 6 – August 1
Credit: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

AGRONOMY/ENTOMOLOGY/NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES 203: Introduction to Global Health
Introduces students to global health concepts through multidisciplinary speakers dedicated to improving health through their unique training. It targets students with an interest in public health and those who wish to learn how their field impacts their global issues.
June 14 – July 11
Credits: 3
Breadth: Social Science

ANIMAL SCIENCES 200: The Biology and Appreciation of Companion Animals
A systematic coverage of many of the animals (including birds) that humans keep as their social companions. The classification, nutritional requirements, environmental considerations, reproductive habits, health, legal aspects and economics of companion animals and their supportive organizations.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

ANIMAL SCIENCES 240: Ancient Animals and Peoples
Provides an introduction to human and animal relationships from prehistory to the present. Examines how animals have influenced social and economic structures of past societies, with a focus on the advent of domestication. Explores the cultural and economic changes that domestication has had on human societies, as well as the behavioral, genetic, and morphological changes that this process had on once wild animals. Emphasizes the methods used to retrace human-animal interactions, drawing on cross-cultural examples from anthropology, ethnozoology, archaeology, history, and genetics.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science, Social Science

COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY 140: Introduction to Community and Environmental Sociology
Sociological examination of the linkages between the social and biophysical dimensions of the environment. Key topics include community organizing, local food systems, energy transitions, environmental justice, resource dependence, and sustainable development. Gateway to advanced courses in sociology.
May 24 – July 11
Credits: 4
Breadth: Social Science

COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY/FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY 248: Environment, Natural Resources and Society
Introduces the concerns and principles of sociology through examination of human interaction with the natural environment. Places environmental issues such as resource depletion, population growth, food production, environmental regulation, and sustainability in national and global perspectives.
June 1 – July 25
Credits: 3
Breadth: Social Science

COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY 260: Latin America: An Introduction
Latin American culture and society from an interdisciplinary perspective; historical developments from pre-Columbian times to the present; political movements; economic problems; social change; ecology in tropical Latin America; legal systems; literature and the arts; cultural contrasts involving the US and Latin America; land reform; labor movements; capitalism, socialism, imperialism; mass media.
June 14 – July 11
Credits: 3 – 4
Breadth: Social Science

COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY 375: Special Topics: Farming in the City
Specialized topics in community and environmental sociology.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 1 – 4
Breadth: Social Science

ENTOMOLOGY 201: Insects and Human Culture
Importance of insects in humans’ environment, emphasizing beneficial insects, disease carriers, and agricultural pests that interfere with humans’ food supply. Environmental problems due to insect control agents.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

ENTOMOLOGY 205: Our Planet, Our Health
An introduction to the multiple determinants of health, global disease burden and disparities, foundational global health principles, and the overlap between ecosystem stability, planetary boundaries, and human health. Explore the core fundamentals of global health scholarship, including but not limited to infectious disease, sanitation, and mental health, and also consider ecological perspectives on these issues through the lens of planetary boundaries. Attention is placed on how human-mediated global change (e.g. climate change, biodiversity loss, land-use patterns, geochemical cycling, agricultural practice) impacts human health and the ecosystem services we depend on. An overview of pertinent issues in sustainability science and planetary health discourse, including the ‘Anthropocene’ and resilience to understand and critically assess global trends.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY 110: Living with Wildlife – Animals, Habitats and Human Interactions
A general survey course of wildlife and wildlife conservation for non-majors. Basic characteristics and management of wildlife populations and habitats. Human perceptions and interactions with wildlife. Current issues in wildlife management and conservation.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

FOREST AND WILDLIFE ECOLOGY 250: Forests and Humans: From the Midwest to Madagascar
Provides an overview of the geography, ecology, and economic importance of the world’s forest biomes. Learn how climate influences vegetation and, in-turn, how forests impact global climate. Meet scientists working to understand the biodiversity and ecological complexity of forest ecosystems, and how these ecosystems support human life. Discuss the threats to forest ecosystems around the world, and hear from the people trying to protect them. Analyze the idea of “sustainability” when it comes to forest management, hear alternative viewpoints about what this word means, and discuss potential trade-offs and conflicts.
May 24 – June 20
Credits: 2
Breadth: Biological Science

FOOD SCIENCE 120: Science of Food
Relationship between food, additives, processing and health. How foods are processed. Current food controversies.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

FOOD SCIENCE 150: Fermented Food and Beverages: Science, Art and Health
Explores the science behind fermented food and beverages, popularized by brewing, winemaking and breadmaking at home and in retail. Introduces the scientific principles that underlie food and beverage processing through fermentation. Covers how basic sciences such as chemistry, biochemistry and microbiology influence the process and desired outcomes when fermenting vegetables, milk, fruit, and grains.
May 24 – July 18
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

GENETICS 133: Genetics in the News
The science of genetics is at the heart of many issues facing our society, and as such, genetics is often in the news. Explores the underlying genetics and methodologies to gain a deeper understanding of the science behind the headlines so that we can make more informed decisions as citizens.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

HORTICULTURE 350: Plants and Human Wellbeing
Plants provide not only the foundation of food, clothing, and shelter essential for human existence, but also some of the key raw materials for transcendence and abstraction through music, art, and spirituality. Since antiquity, we have co-evolved with plants and their derivative products, with each exerting a domesticating force on the other. It is, for example, impossible to think of our modern life without its plant-based accompaniments in the form of cotton, sugar, bread, coffee, and wood. Yet they are so ubiquitous we may forget they all derive from plants discovered, domesticated, bred, and farmed for millennia in a never-ending pursuit to improve our wellbeing. Major points of intersection between plants and human wellbeing will be explored.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 2
Breadth: Biological Science

LIFE SCIENCES COMMUNICATION 251: Science, Media and Society
Introduction to communication at the intersection of science, politics and society; overview of the theoretical foundations of science communication and their relevance for societal debates about science and emerging technologies across different parts of the world.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Humanities, Social Science

NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES 132: Nutrition Today
Nutrition and its relationship to humans and their biological, social, and physical environment; current issues and concerns that affect the nutritional status of various population groups.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

PLANT PATHOLOGY 123: Plants, Parasites and People
The course will explore the interaction between society and plant-associated microbes. Topics include: the Irish potato famine, pesticides in current agriculture, role of economics and consumer preference in crop disease management and the release of genetically engineered organisms.
June 14 – August 8
Credits: 3
Breadth: Biological Science

SOIL SCIENCE 131: Earth’s Soil: Natural Science and Human Use
A overview of the soils of the world and the grand environmental challenges that face humanity. Soils of the USA and Wisconsin included.
June 7 – July 4
Credits: 1
Breadth: Physical Science