Drought tolerance and transgenic traits – Audio

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Drought tolerance and transgenic traits

Joe Lauer Extension Corn Agronomist
Department of Agronomy
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-7438
(608) 262-1390
jglauer@wisc.edu

3:09 – Total time
0:15 – What’s new
0:41 – Yield enhancing vs protecting
1:14 – The difference
1:49 – Where the trait comes from
2:28 – Who will DroughtGard help
2:59 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Looking at some new corn hybrid technology we’re visiting today with Joe Lauer, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Joe, what are you seeing that is new in these corn hybrids this season?

Joe Lauer: Well last year we saw for the first time a brand new transgenic trait that has a lot of potential, it’s called DroughtGard. We had it in 11 different hybrids this past year and three of them were star, which means that they were not statistically different from the top yielding hybrid in a trial. And that’s always a good sign that a trait is off to a good start on performing well. This particular trait is what I would call more like a yield enhancing trait than the traits we currently have available to us. The ones we have available are what I call yield protecting traits, things that we can control insects with, control weeds with more easily. They don’t necessarily add to yield but they allow us to keep some of the pests that corn plants commonly encounter at bay a little bit better. Continue reading

The environmentally friendly cow – Audio

Friday, February 17th, 2017

A cow caught at breakfast. Marshfield ARS. Photos by UW-Madison CALS Sevie Kenyon

The environmentally friendly cow
Randy Shaver, extension dairy nutritionist
Department of Dairy Science
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-3491
(608) 263-3308
rdshaver@wisc.edu

3:04 – Total time
0:15 – What is an environmentally friendly cow
0:27 – Efficient Cows
0:52 – Breeding indexes
1:05 – How we got here
2:05 – Research support
2:55 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT
Sevie Kenyon: The environmentally friendly cow, we’re visiting today with Randy Shaver, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin – Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Randy, what makes an environmentally friendly cow?

Randy Shaver: Well, it’s one that we can minimize the amount of waste product that the cow excretes in the environment and talking a lot about nitrogen and phosphorus and these days even methane emissions. Continue reading

A classroom in the woods – Audio

Friday, October 21st, 2016

A classroom in the woods

Scott Bowe, Superintendent
Kemp Natural Resources Station
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
sbowe@wisc.edu
715-358-5667

2:58 – Total Time
0:15 – Kemp NRS research, teaching, outreach
1:05 – Community involvement
1:26 – A classroom in the woods
2:15 – More room, year around use
2:30 – Classroom for field work
2:47 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: A classroom in the woods, we’re visiting today with Scott Bowe superintendent, Kemp Natural Resource Station University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Scott, start out by telling us what is the Kemp Natural Resource Station.

Scott Bowe: Kemp station is located in Woodruff, Wisconsin right on Tomahawk lake. A wonderful setting for focusing on natural resource research. We look at everything from forestry research, wildlife research, and some aquatic research as well. Our station really has three components we have a teaching mission, an outreach mission, and a research mission. Of course, the teaching component fits well with our teaching that we do on campus and we can provide the field component here in the north woods. The outreach component is very important to show Wisconsin what we do, convey some of the research that we are working on and that is actually a very fun part of what we do up here and of course the research component this past year we had more than 80 different research projects going on, on station. So that is a really important part of what we do as well. Continue reading

Stop the spiny water flea – Audio

Friday, June 17th, 2016

Bret Shaw, Extension Environmental Communications Specialist
(Music by Ella Shaw)
Department of Life Sciences Communication
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
608.890.1878
brshaw@wisc.eduSpiny water flea newspaper

MORE INFORMATION HERE:
http://news.cals.wisc.edu/2016/06/08/video-challenges-wisconsin-boaters-to-help-halt-spiny-water-flea-invasion/
http://stopthespiny.com/

2:56 – Total Time

0:15 – Spiny water flea invasion
0:32 – Screws up native fisheries & water
1:05 – One tough egg
1:34 – Catchy tune to remember by
2:30 – More information
2:47 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

 Sevie Kenyon: Preventing the spread of the spiny water flea. We’re visiting today with Bret Shaw Department of Life Science Communication University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Bret, introduce us to the spiny water flea.

Bret Shaw: Spiny water fleas came to the United States in the 1980s in the bilge water from freight ships coming over from Europe and within a decade or two had spread throughout all of the Great Lakes and now they are moving into the inland lakes. Continue reading