The environmentally friendly cow – Audio

Friday, February 17th, 2017

A cow caught at breakfast. Marshfield ARS. Photos by UW-Madison CALS Sevie Kenyon

The environmentally friendly cow
Randy Shaver, extension dairy nutritionist
Department of Dairy Science
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-3491
(608) 263-3308
rdshaver@wisc.edu

3:04 – Total time
0:15 – What is an environmentally friendly cow
0:27 – Efficient Cows
0:52 – Breeding indexes
1:05 – How we got here
2:05 – Research support
2:55 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT
Sevie Kenyon: The environmentally friendly cow, we’re visiting today with Randy Shaver, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin – Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Randy, what makes an environmentally friendly cow?

Randy Shaver: Well, it’s one that we can minimize the amount of waste product that the cow excretes in the environment and talking a lot about nitrogen and phosphorus and these days even methane emissions. Continue reading

2017 Dairy outlook – Audio

Friday, January 13th, 2017

Mark Stephenson, Extension Dairy Policy Analyst
Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
mwstephenson@wisc.edu
Phone (608) 890-3755

NOTE: Fourth in a series for 2017 Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook Forum Jan. 19
2017 OUTLOOK FORUM REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Registration open for 2017 Wisconsin Ag Outlook Forum


AGENDA & REGISTRATION

2017 Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook Forum

2:39 – Total Time
0:16 – Improving milk prices ahead
1:03 – Farm bill and dairy policy
1:42 – Trade policy a concern for dairy
2:21 – Better milk prices second half
2:31 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Taking a look ahead at dairy in 2017, we’re visiting today with Mark Stephenson, Center for Dairy Profitability, University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Mark, what can dairy farmers expect in 2017?

Mark Stephenson: They can expect improvement. We hit the bottom in May of 2016 of our prices in this trough, I expected that through the end of 2016 we’d see improvement and on into 2017. I don’t think we are going to see anything dramatic until we get half way through the year. We started to see a flurry of buying on the world markets when prices were at their bottom because everybody wants to step in and take the opportunity to buy when prices are low. The next time we’ll see a flurry of activity is when people start to feel like stocks are getting tight and there’s not as much product available as they would like to have. So, that hasn’t started yet, I don’t think that will happen until we get to the second half of 2017. Continue reading

Alumna Molly Sloan on judging the World Dairy Expo – Audio

Friday, October 28th, 2016
Molly Sloan, alumna '06, Arshire judge, 2016 World Dairy Expo

Molly Sloan, alumna ’06, Arshire judge, 2016 World Dairy Expo

Molly Sloan, Alta International Training Program Manager
Alta Genetics
’06 Alumna Dairy Science, Life Sciences Communication
msloan@altagenetics.com
(815) 670-3706

MORE PHOTOS AVAILABLE HERE: https://flic.kr/s/aHskEVdcHv

3:07 – Total Time
0:28 – Dairy science at UW-Madison
0:59 – Student activities led to networks
1:49 – Judge at Expo a dream come true
2:26 – 10 or more shows a year
2:41 – Love to judge Expo again
2:56 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: At the 2016 World Dairy Expo we were able to catch up with dairy judge, Molly Sloan, a 2006 graduate in Dairy Science and Life Science Communications in the University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Molly talked to us about her time here at the university and being a dairy judge at the World Dairy Expo. Molly start out by telling us a little bit about your experience at the University of Wisconsin.

Molly Sloan: I grew up in Northern Illinois and I knew all along that I wanted to study dairy science and so I realized quickly that there was really no other option than to attend the University of Wisconsin in Madison, being world renowned for their dairy science program and when I was there I quickly added a second major with Agriculture Journalism and was very involved through extracurricular activities with the Association of Women in Agriculture, Badger Dairy Club, and National Agri-Marketing Association. Continue reading

Dreams of walking on colored shavings

Thursday, October 27th, 2016
Molly Sloan, alumna '06, Arshire judge, 2016 World Dairy Expo

Molly Sloan, alumna ’06, Arshire judge, 2016 World Dairy Expo

In her youth, Molly Sloan dreamed of one day stepping onto the colorful shavings on the floor of the Dane County Coliseum in order to judge dairy cattle at the World Dairy Expo. Her inspiration came from growing up on a small dairy farm in northern Illinois, taking in everything about the business and the animals. From the farm, Sloan took the steps necessary to reach the Expo and make her dreams come true.

She spent time in 4-H starting when she was 10, and she helped neighboring dairy farms get cattle ready for the state fair. Sloan absorbed more and more with each step.

“I knew all along that I wanted to study dairy science and so I realized quickly that there was really no other option than to attend the University of Wisconsin in Madison, being world renowned for their dairy science program,” Sloan says. “And when I was there, I quickly added a second major with agricultural journalism (now life sciences communication) and was very involved with the Association of Women in Agriculture, Badger Dairy Club and the National Agri-Marketing Association.”

As a college student, Sloan took advantage of every possible opportunity to learn about dairy cattle and network with the many dairy business professionals associated with dairy science. She practiced judging with her team in the Badger Dairy Club and sharpened her eye for what makes an ideal cow.

“There are certain people who can just ‘see’ cattle better than others, and Molly is one of them,” says Ted Halbach, an associate faculty associate in the UW-Madison dairy science department, whose role includes student advisor and judging coach for the department.

“Judging at World Dairy Expo has always been a dream of mine,” Sloan says. “When I came to school at the University of Wisconsin, I knew right away that I wanted to be involved in the dairy judging team. I was fortunate enough to be a part of a very competitive team with exceptional coaching from Dave Dickson and Ted Halbach. After that, I knew that I wanted to continue judging if the opportunity arose.”

While pursuing her two majors and fine-tuning her judging skills in college, Sloan also interned with genetics and artificial insemination firms, which further strengthened her career objectives.

“I learned that I definitely wanted to pursue a career in dairy genetics and reproduction,” she says. “So, when I finished college, I started with Alta Genetics, and now I’m Alta’s Global Training Program Manager and travel the world pretty extensively.”

She has found a way to balance her world travel with judging dairy cattle. Sloan reports judging at about 10 shows a year and that it once “crept up close to 20.”  Judging Ayrshires at the 2016 World Dairy Expo was her second time on the colored shavings she dreamed about as a kid—and it’s not likely to be her last.

“I want to keep doing it as long as it’s fun,” Sloan says. “For me every new show is a great opportunity and experience. I would love to have the opportunity to come back and do another show here on the colored shavings.”

Wax to seal silage bunks? – Audio

Friday, September 30th, 2016
Matt Akins, Marshfield ARS, with wax silage cover experiment

Matt Akins, Marshfield ARS, with wax silage cover experiment

Matt Akins, Extension Dairy Heifer Management Specialist
Marshfield Agricultural Research Station
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
msakins@wisc.edu
(715) 384-9459
3:01 – Total Time
0:19 – Wax to seal silage packs
0:31 – Safer, easier
0:56 – How it works
1:16 – Still expensive
1:47 – Custom applicators
2:20 – It’s an experiment
2:39 – No plastic needed to cover bunks
2:50 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: An alternative to plastic and tires on big bunk silos. We’re visiting today with Matt Akins Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the Marshfield Agricultural Research Station. Matt you’ve got an interesting project out here with your silage bunks can you describe it for us briefly?

Matt Akins: We were looking at alternative ways to cover bunker silos; we’re looking at using some wax mixtures to cover the silage instead of plastic and tires.

Sevie Kenyon: Matt, why would this particular alternative be attractive?

Matt Akins: So the main reason that we feel that it would be attractive is that it makes it a lot easier for feeding of the silage for the producer you don’t need to peel the plastic back every few days, it’s a lot safer for the workers, plus you don’t even need to peel it back you can feed it right with the silage itself so it makes it a lot more convenient. Continue reading

Alexa Roscizewski dairy sheep intern – Audio

Friday, September 16th, 2016
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Alexa Roscizewski

Alexa Roscizewski, Student, Animal Science
Department of Animal Science
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
Alexa Roscizewski <aroscizewski@wisc.edu>
Or:
David Thomas, Professor
dlthomas@wisc.edu
Phone (608) 263-4306, (608) 263-4300

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
http://ecals.cals.wisc.edu/2016/08/08/final-spooner-sheep-day/
PHOTOS FOUND HERE:
https://flic.kr/s/aHskGqu7Zf

3:04 – Total Time
0:33 – Learning opportunity
0:57 – Beef, FFA, 4-H
1:23 – Dairy sheep love
1:37 – Future in genetics, meat science
1:51 – Genetics for better animals
2:10 – UW-Madison experience
2:34 – Sad to see dairy sheep go
2:56 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: The last student to work with the UW-Madison Dairy Sheep program. We’re visiting today with Alex Roscizewski student in Animal Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Spooner Agricultural Research Station. Alexa tell us a little bit about how you got involved in the dairy sheep program.

Alexa Roscizewski: I actually took sheep production last semester with Dr. Thomas and he sent an application to everyone in the class and I thought it looked like a great opportunity. I was really interested in getting into research and handling some sheep since it’s a new experience to me and he apparently thought a girl with a beef background was perfect to work at the dairy sheep program. Continue reading

2016 Wisconsin dairy outlook – Audio

Friday, January 15th, 2016

A look at dairy in 2016

Fourth audio in a series produced in concert with the Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook Forum Thursday, Jan. 21 on the UW-Madison campus. Registration costs $15.00 and covers both the lunch and the forum. For more information and to register, visit: http://agoutlook.cals.wisc.edu/

KEYWORDS: Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook

Mark Stephenson, Extension Dairy Policy Analyst
Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
mwstephenson@wisc.edu
Phone (608) 890-3755

2:53 – Total Time

0:17 – More of the same in 2016
1:07 – A lot of dairy to clear the markets
1:37 – Look for prices to improve later in 2016
2:09 – Cull cows, tighten belt
2:45 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Looking into the year 2016 for Wisconsin dairy business. We’re visiting today with Mark Stephenson Center for Dairy Profitability University of Wisconsin-Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Mark, what kind of year can dairy producers look forward to?

Mark Stephenson: You know we’ve had just a hint with futures markets in the last month or two of prices that have been increasing a little bit, and I think some people have felt like “okay, we’re at the bottom, we see our way back up” and I actually think that what were looking at is a small increase that’s going to be a false one, and I think we’ve got a bit more decline to go. First six months of the year I think could be a bigger drop than a lot people are thinking, and then some recovery by the time you get into the third quarter of the year. I don’t think it’s going to be a remarkable year, I think if you thought that 2015 was okay, I think you’re going to think that 2016 was okay too, except that this is like two years in a row now of these, just treading water, not really feeling great or not horrible. Continue reading

A look back at 2015 for Wisconsin dairy business – Audio

Friday, January 8th, 2016

2015 Dairy year in review

Third audio in a series produced in concert with the Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook Forum Thursday, Jan. 21 on the UW-Madison campus. Registration costs $15.00 and covers both the lunch and the forum. For more information and to register, visit: http://agoutlook.cals.wisc.edu/

KEYWORDS: Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook

Mark Stephenson, Extension Dairy Policy Analyst
Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
mwstephenson@wisc.edu
Phone (608) 890-3755

3:04 – Total Time

0:17 – Big milk price drop in 2015
0:40 – Started year in good shape
1:09 – Still made money in 2015
1:51 – Federal program little needed
2:25 – Risk management
2:43 – Break in feed prices
2:55 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Taking a look at 2015 Wisconsin dairy business. We’re visiting today with Mark Stephenson, Center for Dairy Profitability University of Wisconsin-Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Mark, what kind of year did Wisconsin dairy farmers have in 2015?

Mark Stephenson: Well it was a big surprise in comparison to the year before, 2014. 2014 was the best milk price year we’ve ever had so dairy farmers were celebrating, 2015 was a big drop in milk price and I would call it, probably, a drop to normalcy. Continue reading

Cropp: Milk prices likely to rise in face of drought and uncertainly

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Prices paid to dairy producers for milk are likely to increase in the coming months, says Bob Cropp, emeritus professor of agricultural economics in his August Dairy Situation and Outlook. Drought has shrunk the potential size of the corn and soybean crops and has already reduced the production of hay as much as 29 percent. The tight supplies of increasingly expensive feed and hot weather have combined to make farmers send more cows to market and restricted milk production. As a result of less milk being produced and strong dairy sales milk prices are likely to increase to $20 cwt for most of the year. Read the entire August Dairy Situation and Outlook.

2012 Ag Outlook Series: Mark Stephenson Wisconsin dairy outlook – Audio

Friday, January 27th, 2012
[audio:http://news.cals.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/mark_stephenson_2012_dairy_outlook.mp3|titles=Mark Stephenson 2012 Wisconsin dairy outlook]

Mark Stephenson, Dairy Policy Analyst
Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
mwstephenson@wisc.edu
Phone (608) 890-3755

Milk prices and dairy policy in 2012

3:28 – Total Time

0:20 – 2012 milk price forecast
0:43 – 2011 record milk prices
1:10 – Taking advantage of exports
1:45 – New kid on dairy export block
2:07 – Dairy policy and the farm bill
3:00 – Advice for dairy producers
3:18 – Lead out

Transcript

Looking ahead at the dairy industry in the year 2012. We’re visiting today with Mark Stephenson, dairy policy analyst, University of Wisconsin, in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin…and I’m Sevie Kenyon.

Sevie Kenyon: Mark, welcome to our microphone. What can you tell dairy producers about the year ahead?

Mark Stephenson: I can tell you I think with some assurity that the year ahead is going to be a bit more marginal then this past year’s been. I mean 2011 closed the year out as the highest milk prices we’ve ever had, currently forecasting something like a $1.50 to $1.75 a hundredweight, less.

Sevie Kenyon: Mark, let’s just take a quick look back at the year. What caused those record prices?

Mark Stephenson: Well, we had recovery. We had recovery in a lot of different ways. We had recovery domestically we also had stronger recovery in what we would call developing economies. And, those countries are importing dairy products, and quite a lot of them. That’s our real growth opportunity for the U.S. dairy industries…the export of dairy products.

Sevie Kenyon: And what steps can the American or even the Wisconsin dairy business take to better play in that international market?

Mark Stephenson: I think we need to consider our product mix. Currently the major items that we’re selling are the fairly low value items. In export markets, its non-fat dry milk or skim milk powder; its whey products. We probably ought to be considering whether we can sell a little bit more of our higher value products like cheese. We are selling more… a new trade agreement with South Korea…we’re supplying as much as 45 percent of all of South Korea’s demand for cheese right now.

Sevie Kenyon: How is the position of the country changed recently, relating to this international dairy trade?

Mark Stephenson: You know, we’re really only five years into being any kind of major exporter. We’re still new, we’ve still got a lot to learn about that. We still have investments to make. We need to have facilities, in my opinion, in other countries. They’re our customers; we need to be close to them to respond to their needs.

Sevie Kenyon: Mark, where does dairy policy and the farm bill factor into the year ahead?

Mark Stephenson: [laughs] I think it’s going to be one of those very interesting, fascinating years from farm policy and it’s really hard to script. But we do have dairy policy that we know has been introduced and it’s likely that that will at least be the starting point for discussion. That’s a very different policy than we have today. It would get rid of the MILC program, as an example, it would get rid of dairy product price support program, it would replace that with a margin insurance…that is not required, but could be signed up for. And if you do that, it would also carry with it the obligation to reduce milk production or not be paid for a portion of your milk, when we’re in a bad margin situation.

Sevie Kenyon: And Mark, do you have any advice for our dairy producers out there?

Mark Stephenson: Watch for margin opportunities. There are instruments you know you can use, like futures markets or forward contracting, and lock in a margin protection, if you’re vulnerable. You’ll need to be a little bit careful; I think, in the years ahead here to make sure you’re going to be long term in this business.

Sevie Kenyon: We’ve been visiting with Mark Stephenson, dairy analyst, University of Wisconsin, in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin…and I’m Sevie Kenyon.

Tags: Mark Stephenson, dairy, ag economy, dairy markets, farm policy