Drought tolerance and transgenic traits – Audio

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Drought tolerance and transgenic traits

Joe Lauer Extension Corn Agronomist
Department of Agronomy
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-7438
(608) 262-1390
jglauer@wisc.edu

3:09 – Total time
0:15 – What’s new
0:41 – Yield enhancing vs protecting
1:14 – The difference
1:49 – Where the trait comes from
2:28 – Who will DroughtGard help
2:59 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Looking at some new corn hybrid technology we’re visiting today with Joe Lauer, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Joe, what are you seeing that is new in these corn hybrids this season?

Joe Lauer: Well last year we saw for the first time a brand new transgenic trait that has a lot of potential, it’s called DroughtGard. We had it in 11 different hybrids this past year and three of them were star, which means that they were not statistically different from the top yielding hybrid in a trial. And that’s always a good sign that a trait is off to a good start on performing well. This particular trait is what I would call more like a yield enhancing trait than the traits we currently have available to us. The ones we have available are what I call yield protecting traits, things that we can control insects with, control weeds with more easily. They don’t necessarily add to yield but they allow us to keep some of the pests that corn plants commonly encounter at bay a little bit better. Continue reading

Drought tolerance and transgentic traits II – Audio 6:30 minutes

Friday, February 24th, 2017

Joe Lauer Extension Corn Agronomist
Department of Agronomy
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-7438
(608) 262-1390
jglauer@wisc.edu

6:30 – Total time
0:16 –What’s new
1:14 –Yield enhancing vs yield protecting
2:18 – Where it comes from
3:05 –No drought situation
3:30 – Is it worth it
5:16 –Who benefits
6:20 – Lead out

Transcript:

Sevie Kenyon: Looking at some new corn hybrid technologies, we’re visiting today with Joe Lauer, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin – Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Joe, what are you seeing that’s new in these corn hybrids this season?

Joe Lauer: Last year we saw, for the first time, a brand new transgenic trait that has a lot of potential. It’s called DroughtGard, we had it in 11 different hybrids this past year and three of them were starred which means that they were not statistically different from the top yielding hybrid in a trial, and that’s always a good sign that trait is kind of off to a good start and performing well. This particular trait, what I would call more of a yield enhancing trait than the traits we’ve currently have available to us, they’re, the ones we have available, are what I call yield protecting traits. Things that we can control insects with, control weeds with more easily, they don’t necessarily add to yield but they allow us to keep some of the pests that corn plants commonly encounter at bay a little bit better. Continue reading

Moldy corn and soybean issues – Audio

Friday, October 7th, 2016

Moldy corn and soybean issues

Damon L. Smith, Extension Field Crop Pathologist
Department of Plant Pathology
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
damon.smith@wisc.edu
(608) 262-5716

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
http://fyi.uwex.edu/fieldcroppathology/

http://fyi.uwex.edu/fieldcroppathology/2016/10/03/corn-stalk-rots-and-ear-rots-a-double-whammy-for-wisconsin-corn-farmers/

http://fyi.uwex.edu/fieldcroppathology/2016/10/03/phomopsis-seed-decay-an-increasing-issue-for-delayed-soybean-harvest-in-wisconsin/

3:01 – Total Time

0:17 – Corn & soybeans being hit
0:47 – Found statewide
1:50 – Threat of toxins, lower quality
2:43 – For more information
2:51 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: We’re look at some moldy corn and soybeans. We’re visiting today with Damon Smith Department of Plant Pathology University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Damon, can you give us a quick snap shot of what’s going on with our corn and soybeans?

Damon Smith: Yeah, we’ve got a lot of corn around the state that’s either had stalk rot or ear rot issues or in a lot of cases, both. We’ve actually seen some corn go down already this year because of stalk rot issues and now we’re delayed harvest and so we’re going to have a lot of ear rot issues in there. So, in soybeans we’re seeing a particular rot, phomopsis seed decay, really only one issue in soybeans but it can be significant if we can’t get in these fields pretty soon.

Sevie Kenyon: Damon how wide spread are these issues?

Damon Smith: Pretty wide spread across the whole state. It does vary pretty much where you are in the state in terms of the actual incidence within a field. Usually in the fields that we’ve seen more wet weather those are going to be the ones harder hit. So, west side of the state is going to probably be worse than the east side where we’ve seen a lot of rain.

Sevie Kenyon: Damon what does this look like in the field?

Damon Smith:  In corn we have three different ear rot diseases so we’ve got fusarium, giberrella, and diplodia are the three significant ear rots there. Basically, if a grower wants to find out whether they have and ear rot problem they should choose 5 locations in that field take 10 ears out of those 5 locations pull those ears back and look for white moldy growth on those ears. If they see something they can certainly send it in to our diagnostic clinic for a diagnosis for sure, and soybeans they’re going to want to do a similar thing, kind of scout out multiple locations in the field, crack some pods open and see how bad the decay issue is there.

Sevie Kenyon: What are the effects of these molds in the various crops?

Damon Smith: So, in corn you know that we really worry about secondary metabolites, what we call mycotoxin accumulation so fusarium and giberrella fungi produce these mycotoxins. Fortunately, with diploida the third group of organisms that are causing ear rots we don’t have that mycotoxin issue with that particular organism, but it does cause reduced quality. Of course, with a mycotoxins we’re worried about feeding that to animals or that mycotoxin contaminated grain making it into the human food supply. With soybeans we don’t have any mycotoxin issues but we have seed rot associated with phomopsis seed decay we’re going to see really low seed quality coming out of fields having high levels of phomopsis seed decay. We’re going to see lighter grain, lower yields in those fields for sure.

Sevie Kenyon:  And Damon, where should people go if they need more information?

Damon Smith: They just simply google “Wisconsin field crop pathology” and we have some resources on that website for both corn, grain, and also soybean.

Sevie Kenyon: We’ve been visiting with Damon Smith Department of Plant Pathology University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon.

2016 corn season underway – Audio

Friday, May 13th, 2016

2016 corn season underway

Joe Lauer Extension Corn Agronomist
Department of Agronomy
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-7438
(608) 262-1390
jglauer@wisc.edu

3:05 – Total Time
0:17 – Corn planting has good start
0:40 – Early season start
1:01 – Early starts favor corn yields
1:26 – Characteristics of a good season
2:05 – Degree units drive emergence, season
2:57 – Lead out

TRANSCRIPT

Sevie Kenyon: Is 2016 setting up to be a good corn yield year? We’re visiting today with Joe Lauer, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and I’m Sevie Kenyon.
Joe, the planting season is underway, what do you see here so far?
Joe Lauer: Well, we’re off to a good start; weather’s cooperated pretty well.  We’ve started to plant our research plots around the state. Things are progressing well. We had kind of a slow start, but these last couple week’s Mother Nature’s really cooperating, we’ve had pretty good weather to get a lot of corn in. Continue reading

Corn gene patented – Audio

Friday, April 29th, 2016

Flowering time gene for corn
Shawn Kaeppler, Professor
Department of Agronomy
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
smkaeppl@facstaff.wisc.edu
(608) 262-9571

3:00 – Total Time
0:11 – Why change the corn flowering date
0:24 – Using genetic analysis to manipulate gene
0:43 – Why use the flowering gene
1:15 – Flowering Time gene patent submitted
1:43 – Patenting process
2:08 – Benefits of WARF patent
2:26 – When will patented gene be available
2:37 – How much to license gene
2:52 – Lead out

UW corn trials rewrite record book – Audio

Friday, December 18th, 2015

Corn sets yield records in Wisconsin

Joe Lauer, Extension Corn Agronomist
Department of Agronomy
UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
(608) 263-7438 (608) 262-1390
jglauer@wisc.edu

3:02 – Total Time
0:13 – Wisconsin to have solid corn yields
0:34 – Hybrid trials rewrite record book
0:54 – Corn responded to favorable season
1:24 – Corn yields climb each season
1:45 – Yield increases likely to continue
2:20 – Advice for choosing corn hybrids
2:53 – Lead out
Sevie Kenyon: Wisconsin and its record corn yields, we’re visiting today with Joe Lauer, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Extension in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and I’m Sevie Kenyon. Joe, Wisconsin corn growers had a pretty good season?

Joe Lauer: I think in general, yields are going to come in fairly high. The USDA is forecasting a record year at 165 bushels per acre. We saw that as well in our hybrid trials. We basically re-wrote the record book, 15 new records in the top 50. Continue reading

UW corn hybrid evaluations now available

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

A seemingly simple decision such as which corn variety a grower chooses can have big economic implications. “A one bushel (per acre) increase (in yield) by Wisconsin corn farmers increases farm income $8 to $16 million dollars,” says UW-Madison agronomist Joe Lauer.

Every year, the University of Wisconsin Extension-Madison and College of Agricultural and Life Sciences conduct a corn evaluation program in cooperation with the Wisconsin Crop Improvement Association. The purpose of the program is to provide unbiased performance comparisons of the hybrid seed corn available in Wisconsin. This “consumer report” for Wisconsin corn growers includes evaluation of corn hybrids from 42 companies in 13 planting locations throughout the state.

Additionally, the evaluation adds information about cultural practices such as organic crop production, corn for silage and seasonal growing and harvesting conditions. The report is much sought after by growers and industry professionals involved in producing the four-million acre Wisconsin corn crop.

For complete information:
2011 WISCONSIN CORN HYBRID PERFORMANCE TRIALS
Grain – Silage – Specialty – Organic