Videos

West Madison Ag Research Station

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

More Videos
Healthy Ecosystems

Poll: More boaters taking steps to prevent aquatic invasive species in Wisconsin

Wisconsin boaters and anglers report complying more often with steps aimed at preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in 2013 than they did in 2009, according to a new statewide survey conducted by researchers at the UW-Madison and UW-Extension in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. More than 20 species of AIS threaten Wisconsin waterways. These non-native plants, animals, and viruses can cause economic damage, reduce lakefront property value and diminish recreational opportunities. Boaters and anglers can spread AIS if they do not follow the AIS prevention steps, such as removing plants and animals from boats and draining water from motors and equipment. That means that informing boaters and anglers about the law, and achieving their cooperation, are necessary to protecting the state’s water resources. “For almost all of the AIS prevention steps, people in the 2013 survey said they cooperate more often than respondents in 2009,” said Bret Shaw, environmental communication specialist for UW-Extension and associate professor at UW-Madison in the Department of Life Sciences Communication, who co-authored the report. “For some laws in particular, such as removing plants ...
Tuesday, August 19th, 2014
-20140819
healthy-ecosystems
10
Poll: More boaters taking steps to prevent aquatic invasive species in Wisconsin
Newsmakers

Doug Soldat, turfgrass management expert

Fall lawn care
If you’ve got any thoughts of seeding your lawn, get cracking, says UW-Madison turf expert Doug Soldat. In fact, if you’re going to invest any time or money in any kind of lawn care, late summer and early fall is the perfect time, Soldat says in a new CALS podcast. “The optimum timeline for seeding is August 15th through September 15th. It’s also a perfect time to think about fertilizing your lawn. Finally it is also the best time for weed control. And the window for weed control extends until about the first hard frost,” he says. Why fall? “There’s not a lot of weeds germinating. You have these really nice, warm, sunny days, and the nighttime temperatures get really low. And that allows the plant to make a lot of sugar, make a lot of food, and start growing really rapidly and recovering from any damage that had happened during the year,“ he explains. For more information about Soldat, visit his website.
-20140819
newsmakers
10
Doug Soldat, turfgrass management expert
Changing Climate

UW field day tour focuses on greenhouse gases and crop management

There will be a special session on research related to greenhouse gases and crop management at the Agronomy/Soils Field Day at 8 a.m. Aug. 27 at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station. Tours at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. will show how greenhouse gases are collected across different Wisconsin cropping systems and describe recent research discoveries and the applications of this research. University of Wisconsin-Extension and UW-Madison invite farmers, agronomists, crop consultants, agri-business, governmental agencies and the general public to attend. Agriculture contributes almost 10 percent of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions—mostly in the form of nitrous oxide and methane. Agricultural soil management contributes 75 percent of the nitrous oxide emissions in the U.S., while livestock and manure account for 34 percent of the nation’s methane emissions. Therefore, researchers have focused on identifying agricultural management practices that can reduce nitrous oxide and methane losses. Reduction in greenhouse gas emissions is often considered an indicator of sustainability. Several industry-led efforts are underway to reduce these emissions. For example, the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy signed an agreement with USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack to reduce ...
Monday, August 18th, 2014
-20140818
changing-climate
10
UW field day tour focuses on greenhouse gases and crop management
CALS in the Media

Meat prices soar

Appleton Post-Crescent
-20140818
cals-in-the-media
10
Meat prices soar
Food Systems

UW Organic Ag Field Day on Aug. 25 will look at soil-building strategies

Successful organic farming isn’t just about producing and marketing a healthy crop. It’s also about building healthier soil. Soil health gets a lot of attention in the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s organic agriculture research program, and it will be a key focus at this year’s Organic Agriculture Field Day on Monday, August 25 from 1–4 p.m. at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station. “The national organic standards require farmers to incorporate production practices that lead to improving soils,” says Erin Silva, University of Wisconsin-Madison assistant professor of plant pathology. “So one our research goals is to understand how various production practices affect different soil parameters especially as it relates to soil health. The impact of production practices on soil health is a component of a number of UW organic ag studies, Silva says. “For example, we have been looking at the impact of various rotations and cover crop practices on organic matter and soil microbial activity. We’ve also been interviewing organic dairy farmers about their overall crop and livestock management practices and then taking soil samples on those farms and looking at the soil microbial activity, organic matter and the nutrient status of the soil,” she says. Tours at the field day will feature research trials focused on organic no-till soybeans, a discussion ...
Friday, August 8th, 2014
-20140808
food-systems
10
UW Organic Ag Field Day on Aug. 25 will look at soil-building strategies