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Managing irrigated manure – Audio

Friday, September 26th, 2014

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CALS landscape architecture alum and his Chicago firm are influencing popular urban landscapes across the country

[caption id="attachment_12108" align="aligncenter" width="484"] Images courtesy of The Lakota Group[/caption] In a loft space overlooking popular bars, restaurants, and a doughnut shop where people line up for blocks in Chicago’s River North neighborhood, Scott Freres ’86 glances at a collection of urban development plans that have created similar buzz. There’s a sketch of the Irish Green lawn at the University of Notre Dame, a new beloved gathering space. There are renderings of a reinvigorated Main Street in downtown Kenosha, Wisconsin. And there are plans from ten former industrial towns in Oregon that are starting to bustle again after years of struggle. The designs are tacked to his bulletin board to remind Freres of the projects he has been a part of since he co-founded The Lakota Group, an urban planning and landscape architecture firm, twenty-one years ago. One of the thumbtacks has special significance: it’s a Motion W, the iconic athletics logo from his alma mater, a place Freres credits with setting him on his path. Today he’s at the forefront of change as urban planning and landscape architecture have evolved into a ...
Tuesday, August 19th, 2014
-20140819
economic-community-development
10
CALS landscape architecture alum and his Chicago firm are influencing popular urban landscapes across the country
Food Systems

Oct. 21 field day on organic vegetable flavor

The last in a series of UW-Madison field days focused on the flavor of organic vegetables will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 21 from 3-5 pm at the West Madison Agricultural Research Station. (Please note that an earlier announcement gave the wrong date for this event. It takes place on Oct. 21—NOT Oct. 24.) At the Oct. 21 event, farmers, chefs and the general public are invited to tour trial plots and join in a taste test of potatoes, carrots, winter squash and onion varieties. The data collected this research project will be analyzed and shared with the public through websites, publications and presentations. The West Madison Agricultural Research Station is located at 8502 Mineral Point Rd., about ½ mile west of the Beltline (U.S. 12&14). For more information, contact Julie Dawson at dawson@hort.wisc.edu or (608) 609-6165
Wednesday, October 1st, 2014
-20141001
food-systems
10
Oct. 21 field day on organic vegetable flavor
Food Systems

Join UW-Madison CALS for “Science of Supper Clubs” on Oct. 17

Food and agricultural scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) will have a big and tasty presence at this fall’s Wisconsin Science Festival. As part of the college’s year-long celebration of its 125th anniversary, CALS faculty will serve up the “main course” at the festival’s Science of Supper Clubs event and participate in panel discussions on climate change and genetically engineered crops. The Science of Supper Clubs is a "three course" event designed to explore Wisconsin’s supper club tradition through a scientific lens. The appetizer will be a SoundWaves lecture and concert. The main course is a science fair-style presentation of supper club foods—cheese, meat, potatoes, ice cream and relish-tray vegetables—by CALS faculty. Dessert will be a roundtable discussion with noted Wisconsin food authors. Science of Supper Clubs runs from 5–8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 17 in the UW-Madison’s Discovery Building. The events are free and open to the public. Tickets for a supper club-inspired tasting plate prepared by Steenbock's on Orchard are available for advanced purchase at go.wisc.edu/supperclubplate. The Wisconsin Science Festival (WSF), which runs Oct. ...
Tuesday, September 30th, 2014
-20140930
food-systems
10
Join UW-Madison CALS for “Science of Supper Clubs” on Oct. 17
Food Systems

South Africa: Team effort in the Eastern Cape

[caption id="attachment_16465" align="alignleft" width="300"] Global health students worked with local residents to establish a vegetable garden.[/caption] In the fertile, rolling hills of the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, it’s hard to imagine a food shortage. But hunger is a serious threat there, especially for children. The area also has high levels of poverty and HIV infection. Researchers at the CALS-based Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems (CIAS) are teaming with local groups to try to improve those conditions. Together they have formed the Livelihood, Agroecology, Nutrition and Development project— LAND for short—to address the region’s complex, interrelated problems. “Using a participatory approach, we have built strong ties with local villagers and their co-op, the Ncedisizwe Co-op, which means ‘helping the nation,’” says CIAS director Michael Bell, a professor of community and environmental sociology.  The Ncedisizwe Co-op encompasses 800 smallholder farmers in 26 villages. Other local partners include the Indwe Trust, an NGO focusing on sustainable development, and Kidlinks World, a Madison-based charity dedicated to AIDS orphans and other vulnerable children. The group’s goals are to provide sustainable livelihoods for smallholder farmers and their communities; to integrate ...
Monday, September 22nd, 2014
-20140922
food-systems
10
South Africa: Team effort in the Eastern Cape
Economic and Community Development

Economic impact of Wisconsin ag: $88 billion, 413,500 jobs

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="192"] Steven Deller[/caption] Wisconsin’s farms and agricultural businesses generate $88.3 billion in economic activity and 413,500 jobs, based on data for 2012, according to a new study by Steve Deller, CALS professor of agricultural and applied economist and UW-Extension community development specialist. “Agriculture remains an important part of the Wisconsin economy,” Deller says. “Even in the most urban parts of the state, agriculture’s contribution is notable.” The study is a follow-up to one that Deller conducted five years ago using 2007 data. He found that agriculture has risen in importance for the Wisconsin economy, despite the combined effects of the drought of 2012 and the Great Recession. It generated $29 billion more economic activity in 2012 than in 2007 and an additional 59,509 jobs. In 2012 it accounted for 11.9 percent of the state’s overall employment (up from 10 percent in 2007), 10.9 percent of labor income, 10.9 percent of total income, and 16.1 percent of industrial sales. How agriculture’s $88.3 billion economic impact breaks down: In 2012, on-farm activity contributed 153,900 jobs, $5.7 billion to labor income (wages, salaries and proprietor income), ...
Friday, September 19th, 2014
-20140919
economic-community-development
10
Economic impact of Wisconsin ag: $88 billion, 413,500 jobs

An amazing summer on “The Amazing Race”

[caption id="attachment_42415" align="alignleft" width="400"] Amy DeJong and Maya Warren. Photo courtesy of CBS.[/caption] Amy DeJong and Maya Warren had a truly epic summer, but they can’t tell you about it. The UW-Madison food science grad students spent the month of June zipping around the globe as part of the cast of the 25th edition of The Amazing Race, the multi-Emmy Award winning CBS television reality show. Along the way, they competed against 10 other two-person teams in various mental and physical challenges, with the goal of beating their rivals to the final destination—and claiming the $1 million prize. Suspense is a critical element of the show, so DeJong and Warren—like all of their fellow cast members—have to be very tight-lipped, at least for now. But one thing they can say: Their scientific training proved to be an asset. “A big part of being a scientist is being comfortable in situations with a lot of details and a lot of unknowns, where you have to persevere. If an experiment fails, you have to keep trying,” says DeJong, who studies candy crystallization in the lab of ...
Friday, September 19th, 2014
-20140919
uncategorized
10
An amazing summer on “The Amazing Race”