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Animal sciences professor Mark Cook receives UW entrepreneurship award

Mark Cook, professor of animal sciences, has been selected to receive a 2015 UW-Madison Entrepreneurial Achievement Award for turning his research and 20 patented technologies into start-up companies with great success. Cook accepted a position as assistant professor at UW-Madison in 1983, became an associate professor in 1990 and a full professor in 1992. He is currently on the faculty of the Department of Animal Sciences, directs the Poultry Research Institute at UW-Madison, and holds affiliate appointments in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Department of Food and Microbiology, and the Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center. He has authored or coauthored more than 95 peer reviewed articles and has been involved in national news coverage of his research. Cook holds patents involving four technological areas, including a technology that improves animal growth and feed efficiency around which he founded successful spinoff Aova Technologies in 2001. Cook also co-founded Isomark LLC, for the early detection of infectious disease using biomarkers in breath. The company's goal is to help health care providers achieve a critical need for earlier and more accurate diagnostic techniques. Several of Cook’s inventions ...
Tuesday, May 5th, 2015
-20150505
food-systems
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Animal sciences professor Mark Cook receives UW entrepreneurship award
Kayla_Kayla Sippl story_morgridge

For CALS senior, a small idea becomes the Wisconsin Idea

The power of the Wisconsin Idea lies not in the solitary action of a single person, but in the collective action of many. Kayla Sippl knows this well. When the University of Wisconsin-Madison senior interned at a hospital in Kianjokoma, Kenya, in spring 2013 on study abroad, she found it odd that there was no soap in the patient bathrooms. The leading cause of death in children globally is diseases that could be prevented with soap, according to international nonprofit Global Soap. Kayla, a biology major in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences from Seymour, Wis., saw a public health crisis. But she also saw a solution. “I figured I wouldn’t be able to single-handedly tackle the problem,” Kayla says. “But maybe introducing how easy it is to make soap to some communities would help.” As it turned out, Kayla wouldn’t be tackling the problem single-handedly. There was her mom, who had been making homemade soap using simple ingredients for years and taught Kayla the techniques. There was entomology professor Susan Paskewitz who encouraged Kayla, an undergraduate assistant in her lab, to pursue the soap-making ...
Tuesday, April 28th, 2015
-20150428
economic-community-development
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For CALS senior, a small idea becomes the Wisconsin Idea
Economic and Community Development

Farm Journal Media CEO returns to finish LSC degree, give back to students

It takes passion and drive for someone at the height of his career to go back to school to finish his degree. “In all those years out of school, my career went so fast, but it would haunt me,” began Andy Weber, the 61-year-old CEO of Farm Journal Media. “It would actually wake me up at night thinking ‘I did all that work but I don’t have that degree.’” [caption id="attachment_17386" align="alignleft" width="150"] Andy Weber, CEO of Farm Journal Media.[/caption] Weber did indeed go back to college and was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in Life Sciences Communication in December 2014. During this time he has become a strong supporter of the Department of Life Sciences Communication and of its students. Last year he and Farm Journal began a scholarship and internship program for students interested in agricultural media. He served as the keynote speaker at the LSC student and donor recognition reception on May 4. Weber’s story begins back in the 1970s when he was an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He said at first he lacked focus and stopped and started ...
Wednesday, May 13th, 2015
-20150513
economic-community-development
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Farm Journal Media CEO returns to finish LSC degree, give back to students
CALS in the Media

New insights into the curious disappearance of the Cahokia Mounds builders

St. Louis Public Radio
-20150511
cals-in-the-media
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New insights into the curious disappearance of the Cahokia Mounds builders
Food Systems

Ride to Farm seeks cyclists, pledges for UW beginning farmer school

Cyclists will ride through the rolling hills of Iowa County on Saturday, June 6 to support the next generation of dairy and livestock farmers. The University of Wisconsin-Madison's School for Beginning Dairy and Livestock Farmers (WSBDF) is currently accepting registrations and pledges for its 12th annual Ride to Farm fundraiser. Cyclists can opt for a hilly 100K ride (about 62 miles) or a less hilly, 52-mile route. Shorter morning and afternoon rides are also options. The event starts and finishes at Botham Vineyards & Winery, located at 8180 Langberry Road, Barneveld, Wis. “We hold this event to raise funds for scholarships and general program activities and to raise awareness of the importance of supporting the next generation of innovative farmers,” says Dick Cates, director of the WSBDF. “We are grateful for contributions of any amount.” Riders will receive a rousing send-off at 8:30 a.m. from UW-Madison alumna Louise Hemstead, Chief Operating Officer of Organic Valley. When the ride is over, Alice in Dairyland will present awards to the top fundraisers during a short ceremony. Individual riders and teams can sign up, solicit donations and ...
Monday, May 11th, 2015
-20150511
food-systems
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Ride to Farm seeks cyclists, pledges for UW beginning farmer school
CALS in the Media

Animal Homes: Cities

PBS Video Nature
-20150505
cals-in-the-media
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Animal Homes: Cities
Food Systems

Animal sciences professor John Parrish honored with UW teaching award

[caption id="attachment_17328" align="alignnone" width="565"] John Parrish (right), professor of animal sciences, works with students in his Animal Science 375: Equine Reproductive Management class in the Horse Barn facility at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 6, 2015. Parrish is the recipient of a 2015 Distinguished Teaching Award. Photos by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison.[/caption] For more than two decades, University of Wisconsin-Madison animal sciences professor John Parrish has been a leader in the use of technology—from PowerPoint to podcasts to Google Glass—to teach the reproductive physiology of livestock. By embracing these tools, Parrish’s students spend less time sitting in a lecture hall and more time in the barn and lab involved in meaningful, hands-on activities. [caption id="attachment_17331" align="alignright" width="200"] John Parrish[/caption] This spring, Parrish’s efforts were recognized with a UW-Madison Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award, an honor given out since 1953 to recognize the university’s finest educators. “Based on exit interviews with graduating seniors over the last 10 years, they almost universally say, ‘John’s reproduction physiology course was so demanding, but we learned so much,’” says Dan Schaefer, professor and chair of the Department of Animal ...
Friday, May 1st, 2015
-20150501
food-systems
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Animal sciences professor John Parrish honored with UW teaching award