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good_taste-1

36 years of teaching good taste

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

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Podcals

The art and craft of marketing

Friday, October 24th, 2014

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Eyelevel-Rendering-with-co_fmt

CALS landscape architecture alum and his Chicago firm are influencing popular urban landscapes across the country

[caption id="attachment_12108" align="aligncenter" width="484"] Images courtesy of The Lakota Group[/caption] In a loft space overlooking popular bars, restaurants, and a doughnut shop where people line up for blocks in Chicago’s River North neighborhood, Scott Freres ’86 glances at a collection of urban development plans that have created similar buzz. There’s a sketch of the Irish Green lawn at the University of Notre Dame, a new beloved gathering space. There are renderings of a reinvigorated Main Street in downtown Kenosha, Wisconsin. And there are plans from ten former industrial towns in Oregon that are starting to bustle again after years of struggle. The designs are tacked to his bulletin board to remind Freres of the projects he has been a part of since he co-founded The Lakota Group, an urban planning and landscape architecture firm, twenty-one years ago. One of the thumbtacks has special significance: it’s a Motion W, the iconic athletics logo from his alma mater, a place Freres credits with setting him on his path. Today he’s at the forefront of change as urban planning and landscape architecture have evolved into a ...
Tuesday, August 19th, 2014
-20140819
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CALS landscape architecture alum and his Chicago firm are influencing popular urban landscapes across the country
Changing Climate

When the isthmus is an island: Madison’s hottest, and coldest, spots

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="600"] Chilly winters may temporarily mask its effect, but the downtown Madison isthmus creates an urban heat island. According to a new study, the city’s infrastructure leads to higher temperatures than its nonurban surroundings. Photo: Jeff Miller.[/caption] As Dane County begins the long slide into winter and the days become frostier this fall, three spots stake their claim as the chilliest in the area. One is a cornfield in a broad valley and two are wetlands. In contrast, the isthmus makes an island — an urban heat island. In a new study published this month in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers highlight the urban heat island effect in Madison: The city’s concentrated asphalt, brick and concrete lead to higher temperatures than its nonurban surroundings. After collecting and analyzing more than two years of temperature and humidity data from a network of 151 sensors throughout the Madison region, they have found some of the area’s hottest, and coldest, spots. The study was aimed at helping the Madison region plan for the future, to think about the impacts ...
Thursday, October 23rd, 2014
-20141023
changing-climate
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When the isthmus is an island: Madison’s hottest, and coldest, spots
Newsmakers

Jeff Sindelar

Bacon, brats and more
Animal sciences associate professor Jeff Sindelar, the state's meat science Extension specialist, has been tapped to give presentations at the Wisconsin Science Festival's Science of Supper Clubs event and the Blue Ribbon Bacon Festival. Sindelar runs statewide educational programs related to meat science, meat processing, and food safety for industry professionals, dieticians, consumers, and youth, including the Master Meat Crafter Program. He also conducts meat science research focused on improving shelf life and food safety of processed meat products. Sindelar's contact info is available on his departmental webpage.
-20141013
newsmakers
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Jeff Sindelar
CALS in the Media

Ebola: Does the risk justify the intensity of coverage?

NPR
-20141011
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Ebola: Does the risk justify the intensity of coverage?
Food Systems

Farmer cooperative conference looks at change, challenges and opportunities

The 17th Annual Farmer Cooperative Conference, November 6-7 in Minneapolis, offers an insightful program on issues of interest and concern to farmer-owned cooperatives. This year’s conference will provide a unique opportunity to hear cooperative leaders assess their business environment. The conference theme is “Change. Challenge. Opportunity.” Farmer-owned cooperatives are faced with new challenges and opportunities every day. The conference will give cooperative leaders the tools needed to navigate challenges ahead. The event will highlight strategic issues such as nonqualified and unallocated equity, managing risk in the global market, assessing the impact of transportation challenges, trends in big data, incorporating sustainability into strategic plans and trends in consumer trust. Now in its 17th year, this annual national conference brings together top cooperative business leaders and industry experts to share the latest in research, trends and innovative approaches used by agricultural cooperatives. The conference is organized by the University of Wisconsin Center for Cooperatives with assistance from a planning committee of industry and academic experts.  “Listening to experts weigh in on potential market developments may also provide attendees with the foresight to prepare for adverse or positive market developments,” says planning committee member Keri Jacobs, who holds the Iowa Institute for Cooperative Economics Professorship at Iowa State University. “Seeing how other cooperatives ...
Tuesday, October 7th, 2014
-20141007
food-systems
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Farmer cooperative conference looks at change, challenges and opportunities
Food Systems

Oct. 21 field day on organic vegetable flavor

The last in a series of UW-Madison field days focused on the flavor of organic vegetables will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 21 from 3-5 pm at the West Madison Agricultural Research Station. (Please note that an earlier announcement gave the wrong date for this event. It takes place on Oct. 21—NOT Oct. 24.) At the Oct. 21 event, farmers, chefs and the general public are invited to tour trial plots and join in a taste test of potatoes, carrots, winter squash and onion varieties. The data collected this research project will be analyzed and shared with the public through websites, publications and presentations. The West Madison Agricultural Research Station is located at 8502 Mineral Point Rd., about ½ mile west of the Beltline (U.S. 12&14). For more information, contact Julie Dawson at dawson@hort.wisc.edu or (608) 609-6165
Wednesday, October 1st, 2014
-20141001
food-systems
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Oct. 21 field day on organic vegetable flavor