Highlights

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2014: CALS Year in Review

Monday, December 8th, 2014

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Videos

Diversity in food systems careers

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

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Announcements

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To the ends of the earth

Monday, January 26th, 2015

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Events

Events

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Food Systems

School for beginning apple growers offered in March

The Midwest School for Beginning Apple Growers, a three-day workshop for people wanting to start an orchard business, will be offered March 13-15 on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. The course will prepare participants to grow and sell apples using a variety of management strategies and tools. “We aim to help people better understand the business of farming, from production to marketing and economics, so that they can set realistic goals and improve their chances of success,” says school coordinator John Hendrickson. Offered in alternate years, the school is a unique program that combines the expertise of seasoned growers and UW faculty. Primary instructors will be Bob Barthel of Barthel Fruit Farm in Mequon, Laura Tisch of Munchkey Apples in Mount Horeb, and Harry Hoch of Hoch Orchard and Gardens in LaCrescent, Minnesota. Joining them will be UW-Madison and UW-Extension fruit specialists Patricia McManus, Amaya Atucha and Christelle Guedot. The school emphasizes sustainable and organic production methods, including integrated pest management strategies, and helps students understand the full cost of establishing an orchard. Participants will have opportunities to network with others intent on making ...
Friday, January 23rd, 2015
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food-systems
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School for beginning apple growers offered in March
Food Systems

Innovations in organic agriculture will be featured at research symposium

More than 40 presenters from across the U.S. and abroad will share the latest developments in organic farming research at the Organic Agriculture Research Symposium (OARS), which will be held in La Crosse, Wisconsin on February 25-26. Participants will learn about new crop varieties developed for organic production, innovations in biological pest management, recent economic data, and advancements in organic livestock care and feeding, and more. Chuck Benbrook from Washington State University will deliver the featured keynote on “The Benefits of Organic Agriculture: Evidence Based Results.” Benbrook’s presentation will include the latest research on the health, quality and nutritional benefits of organically grown food. Organic farmers are especially encouraged to participate in a listening and planning session on research priorities for organic agriculture. Ideas gleaned from this listening session will inform future organic research. OARS is hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems and Department of Agronomy, and sponsored by the USDA Organic Research and Education Initiative, The Organic Center and Ceres Trust. The early registration deadline is January 26. For more information, online registration and room reservations, visit the OARS website: http://www.cias.wisc.edu/oars/. For a limited time, the Radisson La Crosse is offering a special room rate for conference participants. The symposium will be held immediately before the MOSES Organic ...
Thursday, January 22nd, 2015
-20150122
food-systems
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Innovations in organic agriculture will be featured at research symposium
CALS in the Media

Amazing animal farmers that grow their own food

BBC
-20150111
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Amazing animal farmers that grow their own food

Sovereign partners: UW, native nations build collaborative relationships

Call it a turning point. One hundred years ago, more than 50 prominent Native Americans from across the country and Wisconsin gathered at UW-Madison for a weeklong conference. The fourth annual meeting of the Society of American Indians (SAI) in October 1914 was organized around legal issues that affected every Native American. But as it happened, the meeting also marked a shift in how the university viewed its responsibilities toward the state’s indigenous communities. “The SAI conference started a relationship between the university and the tribes of Wisconsin,” says Larry Nesper, a UW-Madison professor of anthropology and American Indian studies. “The university began to reach out to the American Indian communities in the state, sending researchers and other personnel.” Nesper, a Nelson Institute affiliate who has studied the SAI meeting and its impacts, says the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences was one of the first campus entities to engage the nations, establishing the Indian Farm Institutes in 1915 to help develop agriculture in tribal communities in the state. Other projects would follow. “So the Indian people, by coming here, seem to have motivated us and ...
Friday, January 9th, 2015
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uncategorized
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Sovereign partners: UW, native nations build collaborative relationships
Healthy Ecosystems

Clearing the fog about the impacts of emissions trading

In March 2010, southern Wisconsin had the worst particulate air pollution in the nation, and many counties in the southern part of the state routinely exceed the national standard for ozone concentrations. “Wisconsin is unique in that that much industrial activity in the state is centered in small towns or rural areas (such as Wausau or the Fox River Valley) and not necessarily in large urban centers,” notes Corbett Grainger, who has launched a new project to learn more about the impacts of clean air regulations, especially emissions trading. He will track changes in the spatial distribution of air pollutants that result from industries selling their pollution allocations to those firms that find it more expensive to reduce their emissions. “It’s likely that cap-and-trade programs will continue to proliferate, so it’s important to understand how such policies affect different stakeholders in Wisconsin and elsewhere,” says Grainger. Market-based efforts to reduce pollution — such as emissions trading — have long been criticized by members of the “environmental justice” movement and others because of concerns that uneven distribution of pollution adversely affects disadvantaged communities. ...
Friday, January 9th, 2015
-20150109
healthy-ecosystems
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Clearing the fog about the impacts of emissions trading