Joel

Joel Pedersen: Exploring the unknowns of nanomaterials

Although so tiny they are invisible, it’s easy to see that nanomaterials are becoming a big thing. There are odor-fighting socks and antibacterial dishrags impregnated with silver nanoparticles. Nano-sized titanium dioxide can be found in a long list of food and consumer products, including salad dressing, cake frosting, toothpaste and sunscreen. The vibrantly colored screen of the Kindle Fire can be attributed to quantum dots, a.k.a. nano-scale crystals of cadmium selenide. And the list goes on. Nanomaterials are tiny by definition, measuring between 1–100 nanometers along one or more dimension. (By comparison, a human hair is approximately 100,000 nanometers in width.) At this scale, they possess unique physical and chemical properties that make them useful for a wide array of applications, including consumer products, environmental remediation and medicine. Yet there are many unanswered questions about their safety. [caption id="attachment_19911" align="alignright" width="300"] Soil science professor Joel Pedersen studies the biological impacts of nanomaterials, including how these materials interact with cell membranes. Pedersen is part of the collaborative, multidisciplinary research group that makes up the UW-Madison-based Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology.[/caption] “We don’t know a lot ...
Monday, May 23rd, 2016
-20160523
basic-science
10
Joel Pedersen: Exploring the unknowns of nanomaterials

A new whey to manage PKU

Food products made from a specific protein found in whey can safely be part of a more palatable diet for individuals diagnosed with phenylketonuria (PKU), according to a new clinical trial led by researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison and Boston Children’s Hospital. “Our findings could also lead to increased insurance coverage for ‘medical foods’ that individuals with PKU need to lead healthy lives,” says Denise Ney, the lead author of the study. Ney is a professor of nutritional sciences in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at UW–Madison and a researcher at the UW’s Waisman Center. [caption id="attachment_20225" align="alignright" width="300"] Harry Waisman with a patient who was diagnosed with PKU two weeks after birth and put on a low phenylalanine diet. She went on to avoid the dramatic consequences of the metabolic disease and developed typically.[/caption] PKU is a rare disease. It affects approximately 15,000 people in the United States. Individuals with PKU cannot metabolize the amino acid phenylalanine. If left untreated, PKU can lead to the accumulation of dangerous levels of the amino acid in the body, which can cause ...
Thursday, July 14th, 2016
-20160714
health-wellness
10
A new whey to manage PKU

Dairy Dash embodies the spirit of Alpha Gamma Rho

This is one race where cows are welcome—or, rather, people dressed in cow suits. In just three years, the Dairy Dash has become a campus institution that imbues health and fun times with a serious purpose. The event is held in honor of John Klossner, a CALS sophomore who died of a head trauma following an accident at the 2013 Wisconsin State Fair. All proceeds from the 5K run are donated to the Brain Injury Association. “John was a gregarious soul who always enjoyed a good laugh. He made friends easily. People naturally gravitated toward him,” recalls his older sister, Kristin Klossner. Klossner was making his mark at UW–Madison, in particular through his service as a member of Alpha Gamma Rho, the largest social-professional agricultural fraternity on campus. Now marking 100 years at UW–Madison, Alpha Gamma Rho promotes academics along with providing leadership and networking opportunities and fostering fellowship among its members. [caption id="attachment_20189" align="alignright" width="201"] John Klossner[/caption] Nothing embodies Alpha Gamma Rho’s mission more than the Dairy Dash, which members conceived of and run in Klossner’s honor. Each May over the past three years, ...
Wednesday, July 6th, 2016
-20160706
highlights
10
Dairy Dash embodies the spirit of Alpha Gamma Rho
CALS in the Media

Sadly, Eating Curry Probably Won’t Keep You From Going Bald

Smithsonian
-20160729
cals-in-the-media
10
Sadly, Eating Curry Probably Won’t Keep You From Going Bald
Economic and Community Development

Public invited to horticulture field day, vineyard walk at UW’s West Madison Ag Research Station

The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s West Madison Agricultural Research Station (ARS) is hosting two upcoming field days for the general public. The station, located in Verona, has 575 tillable acres on which UW-Madison researchers grow row crops, vegetables and fruit crops, and maintain an extensive horticultural display garden featuring both annual and perennial ornamental plants. The two events are: West Madison ARS Open House/Horticulture Field Day August 20, 2016, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. At this family-friendly field day, visitors can tour the station’s vineyard, vegetable garden and extensive flowerbeds, and participate in a taste evaluation of tomatoes, peppers and other station-grown produce. More than 350 cultivars of annual flowers and vegetables will be on display, as well as 50 perennial ornamental plants. UW-Madison and UW-Extension experts will be on hand to share information and answer questions about pollinators and beneficial insects, insect pests, plant diseases, turfgrass, ways to extend the growing season for vegetables, and general gardening. Vineyard Walk September 7, 2016, 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Attendees will take a walk through the station’s vineyards with UW-Madison experts. Presentations will cover the performance of cold-hardy table ...
Thursday, July 28th, 2016
-20160728
economic-community-development
10
Public invited to horticulture field day, vineyard walk at UW’s West Madison Ag Research Station
Economic and Community Development

Upcoming UW organic ag field days will cover row crops and pastures, vegetable production

University of Wisconsin-Madison agricultural researchers will host two organic-focused field days in the Madison area this summer. The first will be held at Arlington Agricultural Research Station on Tuesday, Aug. 23 from 1:00-4:30 p.m. and will focus on row crops and pastures. The second, set for West Madison Agricultural Research Station on Sunday, Sept. 11 from 2:00–5:00 p.m., will cover organic vegetable production. “The transition to organic requires know-how and strategy. Fortunately, tools exist that can help farmers successfully navigate the changes in production and achieve strong organic yields during the first year of organic certification—and beyond. The university research we share at these field days can contribute to any organic farmer’s toolbox,” says Erin Silva, UW-Madison assistant professor of plant pathology and UW-Extension organic production systems specialist, who organized the August field day. The Aug. 23 Arlington Organic Pasture and Row Crop Field Day held at Arlington Agricultural Research Station will focus on organic row crop production and organic pasture management. A highlight will be a presentation on the roller-crimper technique, an approach that involves knocking down and planting directly into a ...
Wednesday, July 27th, 2016
-20160727
economic-community-development
10
Upcoming UW organic ag field days will cover row crops and pastures, vegetable production
Economic and Community Development

August 11 field day: An organic grain toolbox

There are many reasons to grow organic grain: high demand for organic livestock feed, increased interest in locally produced food-grade grain, and seemingly tireless growth in the organic marketplace. However, weeds, the three-year transition, and a sometimes-steep learning curve can keep farmers or would-be growers from making the jump. To remove these stumbling blocks and get more farmers growing organic grain, the Organic Grain Resources and Information Network (OGRAIN) and the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES) are holding an information-filled field day on August 11, from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. on Doudlah Farms (FarmRite Organics) in Evansville, Wisconsin. Participants will come away with the information and resources they need to start growing organic grain, or to enhance their current operations. “We have an incredible line-up of speakers and presenters from all over the Upper Midwest,” says Anders Gurda, associate researcher in the Organic and Sustainable Cropping Systems lab at UW-Madison and program coordinator for OGRAIN. “We have farmers and researchers that will help you deal with weeds, bankers that will get you through the three-year transition, agency personnel that ...
Tuesday, July 26th, 2016
-20160726
economic-community-development
10
August 11 field day: An organic grain toolbox
CALS in the Media

There’s a Reasonable Explanation For Why This Sloth Won’t Move

Gizmodo
-20160722
cals-in-the-media
10
There’s a Reasonable Explanation For Why This Sloth Won’t Move