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Biofuels in the Yahara Watershed

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

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Podcals

Soybeans and changing climate – Audio

Friday, March 27th, 2015

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Bockehim story feature image

To the ends of the earth

In April 2011, James Bockheim led a small team of researchers to a rocky spit of land called Cierva Point, a habitat protected by the Antarctic Treaty as a “site of special scientific interest.” Home to breeding colonies of bird species like Gentoo penguins, as well as a remarkably verdant cover of maritime plants, Cierva Point is also one of the most rapidly warming places on Earth. [caption id="attachment_16965" align="alignleft" width="300"] James Bockheim (left) in Antarctica with former graduate student Adam Beilke MS'11. They are drilling a shallow borehole in which to install instruments for measuring temperatures of "active layer" soil, which thaws and freezes.[/caption] Bockheim and his crew were beginning another field season on the Antarctic Peninsula, the long finger of rock and ice that snakes past Palmer Station, the United States’ northernmost Antarctic research station, and curls out in the Southern Ocean (see map, page 25). They’d been deposited onshore, along with their gear, by the Laurence M. Gould, a research vessel that wouldn’t return until late May. As the ship sailed back into the frigid sea, Bockheim turned his ...
Tuesday, February 17th, 2015
-20150217
changing-climate
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To the ends of the earth
15830286432_e73a45db12_o (1)

Muddy forests, shorter winters present challenges for loggers

Stable, frozen ground has long been recognized a logger's friend, capable of supporting equipment and trucks in marshy or soggy forests. Now, a comprehensive look at weather from 1948 onward shows that the logger's friend is melting. The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Environmental Management, finds that the period of frozen ground has declined by an average of two or three weeks since 1948. During that time, wood harvests have shifted in years with more variability in freezing and thawing to red pine and jack pine - species that grow in sandy, well-drained soil that can support trucks and heavy equipment when not frozen. Jack pine, a characteristic north woods Wisconsin species, is declining, and areas that have been harvested are often replaced with a different species, changing the overall ecosystem. The study was an effort to look at how long-term weather trends affect forestry, says author Adena Rissman, an assistant professor of forest and wildlife ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "When my co-author, Chad Rittenhouse, and I began this project, we wanted to know how weather ...
Monday, December 22nd, 2014
-20141222
changing-climate
10
Muddy forests, shorter winters present challenges for loggers
Food Systems

Wisconsin Meat Industry Hall of Fame to induct three on May 7

Three individuals with outstanding lifetime contributions to the meat business will be inducted into the Wisconsin Meat Industry Hall of Fame at a recognition ceremony on May 7. They include Clinton Gronau, an entrepreneur who developed a novel smokehouse system; Patrick J. Luby, a respected meat marketing authority; and Robert D. Nueske, who led the successful expansion of his family’s award-winning meat business. More about this year’s inductees: Clinton Gronau Clinton Gronau founded Vortron Smokehouses, Inc., and his stainless steel one-truck smokehouse changed the ability of small meat processors in the United States to control smoking and cooking processes and produce safer products. Born in Chicago, Gronau took a management position with the Atmos Company, a smokehouse manufacturer, before joining Alkar in 1966. In the early 1970s, he formed his own company with his sons, Craig and Roger. Vortron exhibited its first production smokehouse in 1972, and USDA approval was obtained in 1975. Vortron’s was the first federally approved one-truck smokehouse. Gronau, who passed away in 1999, also served his industry as a member and board member of Wisconsin Association of Meat Processors ...
Wednesday, March 25th, 2015
-20150325
food-systems
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Wisconsin Meat Industry Hall of Fame to induct three on May 7
Bioenergy and Bioproducts

Biofuels research uncovers natural fungicide

Scientists at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) recently reported the discovery of a chemical compound called poacic acid that could eventually be used as a fungicide in both sustainable and conventional farming. [caption id="attachment_17174" align="alignright" width="300"] GLBRC assistant scientist Jeff Piotrowski. Photos: Matthew Wisniewski[/caption] “Poacic acid may have the potential to replace copper sulfate, which is used as a fungicide in organic agriculture but accumulates to toxic levels in soil,” says Jeff Piotrowski, GLBRC assistant scientist and lead author on the paper. “But it could also be used in combination with synthetic fungicides, to lower dosage or reduce the chances of developing resistance.” Piotrowski, along with collaborators from the University of Tokyo, discovered poacic acid through research focused on the small molecule inhibitors present when cellulosic biomass – the non-edible portion of plants – is broken down for biofuel production. The inhibitors, which curb growth of biofuel-producing microbes, are considered obstacles in the process of converting biomass to fuel. But Piotrowski and colleagues suspected that the inhibitors’ strong anti-microbial properties meant they could also be valuable outside the context of biofuels. To explore ...
Monday, March 23rd, 2015
-20150323
bioenergy-bioproducts
10
Biofuels research uncovers natural fungicide

CALS invites nominations for Honorary Recognition, Service and Alumni Awards

The University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences invites nominations for its 2015 Honorary Recognition Award, Distinguished Service Award and Distinguished Alumni Award. These are the highest honors bestowed by the college. - The Honorary Recognition Award was first offered in 1909 and has been presented to more than 500 individuals for outstanding service and leadership in the areas of agriculture, life sciences, natural resources and social science. - The Distinguished Service Award, first offered in 1994, recognizes CALS faculty and staff members for commendable service to the college and university, to citizens of Wisconsin, and to people around the nation and the world. - The Distinguished Alumni Award, introduced in 2009, recognizes a CALS alumna or alumnus with a career of outstanding achievement through extraordinary contributions to one’s chosen field or an exemplary record of public service. The awards will be presented at a banquet in Madison in November. Nomination information for each award and a listing of past honorees is available at www.cals.wisc.edu/honorary. Nominations are due April 24. Please contact Kara Luedtke at (608) 890-2999 or alumni@cals.wisc.edu for additional information.
Thursday, March 19th, 2015
-20150319
uncategorized
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CALS invites nominations for Honorary Recognition, Service and Alumni Awards

Mark your calendar for the 2015 UW dairy science golf classic

Tee off with the UW-Madison Department of Dairy Science at the 10th annual Dave Dickson Memorial Golf Classic, scheduled for Wednesday, May 20 at the award winning University Ridge Golf Course in Madison. The Golf Classic uses a scramble format, where each team member plays the ball closest to the hole after each shot. The event is open to the public. A registration fee of $110 per golfer pays for 18 holes of golf, cart rental, free lunch and lots of prizes. The registration fee after April 20 will be $120. All proceeds support the dairy science department’s undergraduate student scholarship program, as well as high-impact learning activities such as student travel, hands-on learning laboratories and undergraduate research. Last year’s outing raised nearly $30,000 for those programs. Individuals or companies can support the event through a sponsorship or donation. One option is to sponsor a hole for $325 or $750 (the latter includes one team registration for four golfers). A lunch sponsorship for $2000 is available and comes with special event signage and one team registration. Two additional options, a beverage sponsorship and ...
Wednesday, March 18th, 2015
-20150318
uncategorized
10
Mark your calendar for the 2015 UW dairy science golf classic
CALS in the Media

Whose science is it anyway? Fla. climate change ban latest in ‘war on science’

The Christian Science Monitor
-20150318
cals-in-the-media
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Whose science is it anyway? Fla. climate change ban latest in ‘war on science’