Videos

West Madison Ag Research Station

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

More Videos

Events

Events

More Events
CALS in the Media

Ticks may transmit disease faster than currently thought

Reuters Health
-20140829
cals-in-the-media
10
Ticks may transmit disease faster than currently thought
Economic and Community Development

Wisconsin Athletics and CALS to celebrate Wisconsin agriculture at Sept. 6 game

University of Wisconsin Athletics is proud to once again partner with state’s agriculture industry for the second annual “Celebrate Agriculture” game on Saturday, Sept. 6, when the Badgers host the Western Illinois University Leathernecks at Camp Randall Stadium. Gameday festivities will celebrate Wisconsin agriculture and its deep connections to the University of Wisconsin. Agriculture will be everywhere throughout the game, from promotions, special graphics and fun agriculture facts.  Commemorative gameday posters will be distributed (first-come, first-served). “There is so much to celebrate about Wisconsin agriculture—dairy, livestock, field crops, vegetables and fruit and a sincere commitment to protecting the environment. As our college celebrates its quasquicentennial, we’re celebrating 125 years of partnership with farmers and agricultural firms that create thousands of jobs in rural and urban areas and billions of dollars in economic activity. We are pleased to join UW Athletics in recognizing these contributions again this year,” says Kate VandenBosch, dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at UW-Madison. Presenting sponsors include Hartung Brothers, Incorporated; CROPLAN by Winfield; Badgerland Financial; Case IH; Accelerated Genetics; DeLaval; Dairyland Seed; Wisconsin Potato & Vegetable Growers ...
Tuesday, August 26th, 2014
-20140826
economic-community-development
10
Wisconsin Athletics and CALS to celebrate Wisconsin agriculture at Sept. 6 game
CALS in the Media

Turkeys in the ‘hood

Isthmus
-20140826
cals-in-the-media
10
Turkeys in the ‘hood
Food Systems

UW field days will focus on the flavor of organic vegetables

[caption id="attachment_16334" align="alignleft" width="300"] Winter squash will be sampled at the last of three organic vegetable field days. The events will be held Aug. 27, Sept. 22 and Oct. 24.[/caption] University of Wisconsin-Madison plant scientists intend to employ some highly sophisticated instruments to evaluate new varieties of organic vegetables: the palates of the people who produce or prepare them for discerning customers. "We think there is a great opportunity to improve collaboration between researchers working to improve the quality of fresh-market vegetables, farmers who are interested in experimenting with new and potentially higher-value crops, and chefs who are committed to serving fresh local produce," says Julie Dawson, an assistant professor of horticulture whose work focuses on direct-market farms that serve urban and regional markets. With that in mind, UW-Madison has scheduled three field days over the next 10 weeks during which farmers, local chefs and anyone else can sample the flavors of a variety of organic vegetable crops. The events will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. on Aug. 27, Sept. 22 and Oct. 24 at the West Madison Agricultural Research Station. ...
Friday, August 22nd, 2014
-20140822
food-systems
10
UW field days will focus on the flavor of organic vegetables
Healthy Ecosystems

Poll: More boaters taking steps to prevent aquatic invasive species in Wisconsin

Wisconsin boaters and anglers report complying more often with steps aimed at preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in 2013 than they did in 2009, according to a new statewide survey conducted by researchers at the UW-Madison and UW-Extension in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. More than 20 species of AIS threaten Wisconsin waterways. These non-native plants, animals, and viruses can cause economic damage, reduce lakefront property value and diminish recreational opportunities. Boaters and anglers can spread AIS if they do not follow the AIS prevention steps, such as removing plants and animals from boats and draining water from motors and equipment. That means that informing boaters and anglers about the law, and achieving their cooperation, are necessary to protecting the state’s water resources. “For almost all of the AIS prevention steps, people in the 2013 survey said they cooperate more often than respondents in 2009,” said Bret Shaw, environmental communication specialist for UW-Extension and associate professor at UW-Madison in the Department of Life Sciences Communication, who co-authored the report. “For some laws in particular, such as removing plants ...
Tuesday, August 19th, 2014
-20140819
healthy-ecosystems
10
Poll: More boaters taking steps to prevent aquatic invasive species in Wisconsin